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  • Best John Deere Combine Ever

    In my opinion, the squareback diesel 105. They are lengendary around here for their reliability and longitivity. A very close second would be the 20 series combine. We had a 9600 but it didn't do as good as job as our 8820 does. I do know a guy that has a first year production 9600 and is still going strong.

  • #2
    In my humble opinion, it would be the 8820,7720. We bought an 8820 in 1989 that had been operated by a custom operator for 1 year. In the 6 years that we ran it, we had 1 minor stop in all. That was a key that slipped out on the top return elevator shaft. Took us only a short time to fix, and away we went. Our 9600 is more comforable, easier to operate, but in the long run, the 8820 would put in just as many bushels in a season as the 9600.

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    • #3
      I like the 7720 and 8820 also. It just seems like it can go and go without breakdowns. For for those of you that have had the 9600 series and the 20 series i got a really slick 7720 and i was thinking aobut a second machine would you reccomend 20 series or 00 series thanks in advance

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      • #4
        Best John Deere combine ever has to be a 1969 105 diesel. In 89 when the 9000 series came out it incorporated much of the basic design of the 5 series combines. I Remember looking at one with a fellow farmer and his first comment was that John Deere "has went back to making them like they used to.

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        • #5
          8820 Titan II with the 50 series motor. Excellent machine, does a great job especially when tweaked a little. Mine has Trelleborg tires front and rear, RWA, Crary extension, bubble up auger, solid cylinder and concave from St. John welding. Just hope I never have to sell it as long as I live. Has been my dream combine for years and now am in my second season with it. I'm sure down the road I'll end up with a bigger, later machine; but plan to keep this one as a backup when that time comes.

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          • #6
            the best combine ever made is sts series and i have a cousin who works for a deere company and he has showing me why the are the best he even ran one in the same field with other color machines nothing runs like a deere

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            • #7
              Do you happen to have a picture of your 88. I would like to see what your tire setup looks like.

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              • #8
                Best is surely the STS because if you look at this combine and see how simple it is built then i must say I'm still wondering how you can get such a great performance with such less parts! Haven't seen anything better jet!

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                • #9
                  I bought a 900 hour 7720 a few years back that had sit in a shed since 1986 and was washed and waxed every year. I spend $17.50 on a belt and ran it for year cut 1000 acres of beans with it. That was the best JD combine I ever saw. And even though I am a IH man I wish I had kept that combine. Hard to service I must say though. later Will

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                  • #10
                    I don't know what model it is but the best combine is the one that eliminated the use of horses. At least you can control a motor and it gives you steady output all day. Now for actual models, I think the 7720 and 8820 when they came out were just as big as the STS models today. I liked our 7720, never had a problem with it but I think the 9500 has too much power for that type of system meaning the belts slip before the engine even dies down. When the load was too much on the 7720, you would know when to slow down.

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                    • #11
                      In their time, the 105 diesels were a great machine, and even better if hydro, quick-tatch feeder house, and variable speed cylinder. They were simple, reliable, and easy to fix when the time came. Frame and side sheets were hot riveted, not spot welded like later machines. Classic design--cab on center, grain tank in middle and engine at rear. Not any of the creature comforts of today, but got job done. Had chance to run prototype 8820 when it was still a gleam in the engineer's eye. Being just a kid running the ol' 105, it was quite impressive. Was told to use it, but don't touch anything you don't know what it is. Ever since that day, and still, want one just to relive the magic of that day. There are a couple 8820 TitanII's in neighborhood that are legendary. Fine, fine machines. Can't say which is better, but both were milestones, and hard to say what current milestone is.

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                      • #12
                        I have never seen a 105 with variable speed cylinder, hydro, or quick tach feeder house. Would like to have one with all of those features. My dream combine is a 1969 105 diesel with hydro, variable speed reel and cylinder, cab with AC, and a 20ft grain header. My father remembers when JD was bringing an 8800 around. Check out by combine photos at ytmag. http:__www.tractorshed.com_cgi-bin_gallery_iphoto_view.cgi

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                        • #13
                          Ive ran 760 and 860 masseys, 7700,7720,8820s as well, couldnt hardley beat the capacity and horsepower of that particulay 88. ran a couple IH 1680s, they hate anything green goin through em, now days im in a bullet proof 9600 with 8000 hours. its been the most durable fast eatin machine ive ever ran.

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                          • #14
                            '69 105 Diesel Corn Special with QT FH. I love mine! I would not trade it for anything! It loves that 643 head. She eats corn! My 6620 is the best I have run in beans. The cab and the 4X4 are the only things I think the 6620 has over the 105.

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                            • #15
                              I can't believe your running a machine with 8000 hours, thats fascinating, never heard of that before. What's your annual repair bill like and do you suffer much downtimeIJ We ran a 1980 N6 up to 3500 hrs, but when we finally pawned her off she was completely wore out, were lucky if it went two days without breaking down!

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