Calving Season

The Big Cowhuna

Farm Hand
Messages
49
How is your breeding and calving season coming along so far? Hopefully all herds represented on this board are doing well. I prefer a spring-summer calving season. Do any of you producers operate in the fall instead when calves are weaned and sold at their seasonal high selling price?
 

sunger

Farm Hand
Messages
11
Not the answers you're looking for, because I raise buffalo, but here I go anyway. Bison typically calve April thru June, followed by a breeding season of July-
Sept. The greatest thing is that pulling a calf is very rare.
Bison ranchers will sell stock generally when they are between 1-2 years old. We raise them longer but sell for a much higher price.
There are only a few changes needed when raising buffalo instead of beef: 1. Six ft exterior fencing. 2. Handling equipment and systems designed for them.
Meat animals are currently going for about $3.30/lb live, or $4.60 hot hanging. Breeding stock sell for (F) $2500 up, and (B) $4500 up, all depending on Quality. Our prices are down this year, which is the first dip we have seen in the past 10 years.
I hope that gives everyone a peek into the buffalo ranch world. Best wishes to all and let's get through this.
 

rogerauf

New member
Messages
3
Pure breeders want January calves but fall calving is so much easier. No scour issues and the temperatures are much easier on the calves. We have groups that calve spring and fall. Generally try to keep more in the fall group but that sometimes depends on the number of open cows we have and how many we let drop back to the next group.
 

sunger

Farm Hand
Messages
11
Pure breeders want January calves but fall calving is so much easier. No scour issues and the temperatures are much easier on the calves. We have groups that calve spring and fall. Generally try to keep more in the fall group but that sometimes depends on the number of open cows we have and how many we let drop back to the next group.
I would think the January's calves struggle with the weather in some areas, but your industry knows much better than I do.
 

The Big Cowhuna

Farm Hand
Messages
49
@rogerauf Are you from the US or do you live in another part of the world? I'm in Texas and I'm an Angus breeder. I would make more off of moving towards a fall-calving season, but I'd also spend a lot more on feed and such since weaning takes longer. I ran the numbers and it just didn't seem worth it. What has been your experience?

@sunger, I love hearing about other livestock industries, so share away. I hope things stabilize soon for you guys! Ethical beef usually does well, but who knows how the changing economy will affect that. I doubt I'll be able to sell to local restaurants much longer as they'll surely close if the coronavirus drags on.
 

rogerauf

New member
Messages
3
@rogerauf Are you from the US or do you live in another part of the world? I'm in Texas and I'm an Angus breeder. I would make more off of moving towards a fall-calving season, but I'd also spend a lot more on feed and such since weaning takes longer. I ran the numbers and it just didn't seem worth it. What has been your experience?

@sunger, I love hearing about other livestock industries, so share away. I hope things stabilize soon for you guys! Ethical beef usually does well, but who knows how the changing economy will affect that. I doubt I'll be able to sell to local restaurants much longer as they'll surely close if the coronavirus drags on.
I'm from Missouri. Calving in the fall is easier and there is no pink-eye issues with fall calves. We creep feed the same in the spring and fall. The only potential drawback with fall calves is that you need the hay available for the winter. That is not an issue here but I could see where hay supply could be a problem in Texas and other drier areas.
 

greg

Farm Hand
Messages
52
Not the answers you're looking for, because I raise buffalo, but here I go anyway. Bison typically calve April thru June, followed by a breeding season of July-
Sept. The greatest thing is that pulling a calf is very rare.
Bison ranchers will sell stock generally when they are between 1-2 years old. We raise them longer but sell for a much higher price.
There are only a few changes needed when raising buffalo instead of beef: 1. Six ft exterior fencing. 2. Handling equipment and systems designed for them.
Meat animals are currently going for about $3.30/lb live, or $4.60 hot hanging. Breeding stock sell for (F) $2500 up, and (B) $4500 up, all depending on Quality. Our prices are down this year, which is the first dip we have seen in the past 10 years.
I hope that gives everyone a peek into the buffalo ranch world. Best wishes to all and let's get through this.
Such an eye-opener, since the usual assumption is that they are difficult animals to raise. Are they naturally belligerent, and how much land does a farmer require when starting?
 
 
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