Choosing raw honey

greg

Farm Hand
Messages
52
Choosing raw honey should be a straightforward process, but since regulations around labeling are not strict, we can't trust anything we pick from the shelves. Again, not all the honey from locally grown stores will meet individual standards. Should you sample flavors and strengths until you find the 'right' one, or is there a better way?
 

Birdie

Farm Hand
Messages
57
You've got that right about regulations and labeling not being strict. I fell into the trap of buying local honey at the store. It was pricier, but I thought it was worth it to support a local producer. Much later I learned that the honey came from a different state. It was just repacked in my area, so it was okay to call it "local". I'm not sure how to find the best raw honey when labeling terms are so loosely defined.
 

RichZ

Golden Chicken
Top Poster Of Month
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151
A lot of beekeepers sell honey right from their property. I think that's the best way to make sure it's local.
 

Homestead Hustle

Farm Hand
Messages
44
RichZ has a good point. I'd look for local beekeepers and see if they sell their honey. Or, if you're feeling adventurous, you could always try your hand at beekeeping yourself. I'm nervous around bees myself, so that wouldn't be an option for me, but it's a great option for those who are okay with bees.
 

RichZ

Golden Chicken
Top Poster Of Month
Messages
151
RichZ has a good point. I'd look for local beekeepers and see if they sell their honey. Or, if you're feeling adventurous, you could always try your hand at beekeeping yourself. I'm nervous around bees myself, so that wouldn't be an option for me, but it's a great option for those who are okay with bees.
We had bees until a few years ago, our hive suffered colony collapse. Domestic bees are pretty amazing. When we started off, my wife (who was the main caregiver to the bees) had the full bee suit, and I just had the helmet with netting. I was a little paranoid, but eventually I was helping her with just the helmet on and wearing a heavy sweatshirt. But I soon learned that the bees actually recognize their care givers. My wife only got one sting over years, and I never got a single sting (my wife spent much more time with them than I did). We had to often open the hive and check them, and the bees often swarmed up our arms. At first it was creepy and scary, but when we realize that they were just curious and had no intention of stinging, it became a really interesting thing to do. When the hive collapsed, we were really sad, we felt like we lost a bunch of pets, believe it or not.
 

greg

Farm Hand
Messages
52
We had bees until a few years ago, our hive suffered colony collapse. Domestic bees are pretty amazing. When we started off, my wife (who was the main caregiver to the bees) had the full bee suit, and I just had the helmet with netting. I was a little paranoid, but eventually I was helping her with just the helmet on and wearing a heavy sweatshirt. But I soon learned that the bees actually recognize their care givers. My wife only got one sting over years, and I never got a single sting (my wife spent much more time with them than I did). We had to often open the hive and check them, and the bees often swarmed up our arms. At first it was creepy and scary, but when we realize that they were just curious and had no intention of stinging, it became a really interesting thing to do. When the hive collapsed, we were really sad, we felt like we lost a bunch of pets, believe it or not.
You've addressed a fear and curiosity that I have always had; when bees swarm the arms in their numbers. I think that the best way around this is for the farmer to keep bees so that standards can be set and kept. I recently managed to get hold of a beekeeper with excellent honey, sold straight from the property!
 
 
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