Conditioning Rolls

Farmer93

New member
Messages
1
I'm in the market to buy a 11.5' Kuhn discbine this spring, and I'm debating which rolls to buy. I've had previous bad luck with rubber on rubber (a Gehl),and great luck with steel on steel (Macdon). Salesmen have been pushing to use rubber, but I'm stuck on Steel. We run a 50 cow dairy, with a lot of grass alfalfa mix. I'd love to see others thoughts.

Farmer93
 

Pinewood Acres

Farm Hand
Messages
97
I'm a tree farmer, so my experience isn't the same, but when I bought a rock picker, the salesmen were pretty aggressively pushing me in a different direction too. It's usually all about their commission. I don't blame them, it's their livelihood, but that means they weren't thinking about me and what I needed. I say stick with what you know. You already know what happens if a rock gets stuck. You know how to fix it. You already know how to deal with the nuances of that type of machinery. If steel on steel worked for you, then stick with that.
 

Birdie

Golden Chicken
Messages
112
I prefer steel on rubber, but each type has its pros and cons. I'm like you though. I didn't have a good experience with just rubber rollers. It took too long to get the hay dry. Maybe that was just a coincidence though.
 

Jack L

Farm Hand
Messages
67
I'm in the market to buy a 11.5' Kuhn discbine this spring, and I'm debating which rolls to buy. I've had previous bad luck with rubber on rubber (a Gehl),and great luck with steel on steel (Macdon). Salesmen have been pushing to use rubber, but I'm stuck on Steel. We run a 50 cow dairy, with a lot of grass alfalfa mix. I'd love to see others thoughts.

Farmer93

Go with what you know, what you're used to and what works for you. The salesperson will still get his/her commission. Maybe not as much as they would like, but they won't starve.
 
 
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