Coronavirus a zoonotic disease?

OhSusanna

Farm Hand
Messages
48
I keep seeing different things on the news and I'm not sure what to believe. Is the coronavirus a zoonotic disease, meaning that it can pass from people to animals and vice versa? Are there any extra precautions we should take when dealing with our livestock?
 

Henderson

Farm Hand
Messages
56
I think the virus is so new that we don't really know what's what and that's why there's so much conflicting information out there. I'm not really doing anything differently than I did before when it comes to caring for my livestock. I've always favored good hygiene and keeping their areas very clean.
 

More Green

Farm Hand
Messages
36
I was just listening to this last night. Ted Talks I believe, and the speaker was saying just that. It did start with a bat, so it is zoonotic at least right there. They were also saying that these types of viruses are bad for poultry. Chickens and such are very susceptible.

Not saying that you don't, but keep your operations as clean as possible. Take extra care with cleanliness.
 

Andrew T

Farm Hand
Messages
51
I know that there is one confirmed case of coronavirus in a cat and a couple of cases in dogs. People did pass the virus to their pets in these cases. So, yes, it is a zoonotic disease. At this point, experts are telling us we don't need to be overly concerned about the virus passing between humans and animals.

I would just take some basic precautions - wash your hands before and after caring for livestock, for instance. I hope that it does not become a major problem for animals the way it has for us humans.
 

The Big Cowhuna

Farm Hand
Messages
49
I just read that a tiger tested positive for the coronavirus at the Bronx zoo. It's beginning to look like no creature will be spared. I'd probably be more willing to cull sick cows at this point. It hasn't happened yet, but if it does, I'll suspect something is very wrong because I don't usually have issues with my cattle. I need to look up how to dispose of sick animals properly. No way could I handle one of my employees getting infected because of my cows. I'm not buying any cattle until this is over. I can't risk letting a new cow infect the whole herd.
 

Skyline

Farm Hand
Messages
67
Yes it is. I know dogs got infected by the virus but they still cannot figure out whether the dogs, which eventually died, are directly caused by the virus or some other indirect consequences (if I am not misunderstanding).
 

leon

Farm Hand
Messages
51
COVID-19 is a zoonotic disease, and as farmers, we all understand how good hygiene should be part and parcel of us every day. There is a lot of conflicting information, with some sources claiming that someone caught it from a bat. Another version is that it originated from pangolins, a scaly mammal that resembles an anteater. Amidst all the uncertainty, scientists will (hopefully) be able to unravel which species passed it to a human. Clearly understanding how a pandemic starts, is key to stopping the next one.
 

Trubadour

Farm Hand
Messages
32
I go with the bat theory because those are some very disease ridden birds.

I also refer to the CDC website for any questions about this. Anything else will simply be someone else's interpretation of the same information I get from that source.
 

leon

Farm Hand
Messages
51
I go with the bat theory because those are some very disease ridden birds.

I also refer to the CDC website for any questions about this. Anything else will simply be someone else's interpretation of the same information I get from that source.
How I have never thought of frequently visiting the CDC website is a wonder; it is a reputable source of information. How soon do you suppose this menace is going to end? As farmers, we need to go back to being fully productive.
 
 
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