Gardening and soil

Charli1

Farm Hand
Messages
60
Last year my tomatoes died early. They got black spots on them and never ripened up. I was told to change the soil in my small garden. I thought about planting tomato plants in buckets with new soil but also use the same soil in the garden for other plants. Any thoughts?
 

Nora

Farm Hand
Messages
14
I thought black spots indicated that the tomatoes were watered incorrectly. Maybe you splashed too much water on the vines and fruit or you watered them erratically. Black spots are usually mold, right? I don't think it's an issue with the soil. However, if you're concerned, you could always avoid planting nightshade plants in that spot.
 

MichaelS

Farm Hand
Messages
34
I had this problem once. I think it's called blight or blithe? Try turning your soil, it should help. Also don't water during the hottest part of the day.

I do like the idea of using buckets though. I'm going to look into that.
 

Sam Carter

Farm Hand
Messages
29
You can also do a soil test. You can buy them cheap at a tractor supply store or Home Depot. They check the various levels of naturally occurring chemicals in the soil. Something there might be off-balance.
 

Desi

Farm Hand
Messages
50
I would suggest testing the soil, it's cheap and easy. We turned our garden soil over a few years back. I added new soil to the top after we turned it over.
 

Lem

New member
Messages
1
This is called "Blossom End Rot" and it is caused by a deficiancy of Magnesium in the soil for the tomatoes.
Purchase a bag of Epson Salts and go by the instructions and you will be ok.
 

Breadtrk

Farm Hand
Messages
40
Soil testing with ammendments for each particular crop along with drip irrigation. I alternate rows or sections each year and grow daikon radishes in the unused areas, then deep till in well composted (5+ year) wood chips that have been seasoned with manure and turned 3 times a year.
 
 
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