Neighbor kid allergic to strawberries

Demeter

Farm Hand
Messages
16
I happen to grow different varieties of strawberries all over my property. When the neighbor bought the house, they didn't know about the strawberries because they aren't as noticeable this time of year. The child is eight-years-old. The parents would like me to get rid of my strawberries. If you were in this situation would you comply or would you take the position that the child is old enough to know not to eat them and to stay in his own yard?
 

Urban Homestead

Golden Chicken
Messages
117
Does the kid have special needs? I think that's the only time that I would even consider it for a child who is old enough to know better. Really, I can't imagine making such a request of a neighbor in the first place.
 

The Big Cowhuna

Farm Hand
Messages
81
Wow. If strawberries were that big of a deal, wouldn't you ask your potential neighbors if they grew them during the spring and summer months? Even if they had done that, they'd have no guarantee that their neighbors wouldn't plant them in the future. Keep your strawberry patches. I sympathize with the parents, but they should've checked on that before buying the house.
 

Petal to the Metal

Golden Chicken
Messages
115
I'm not sure what I would do in this case. If the child had an EpiPen, then I just might comply because the allergy is serious enough to lead to death. Although I think the parents and child bear the responsibility for keeping away, I couldn't live with myself if a child died because he ate one of my berries. It wouldn't be my fault, but I'd still feel immense guilt. It's just not worth it.
 

Holii

Farm Hand
Messages
33
Wow, that's a tough one. I would say that the child is old enough to stay away from the berries. Is the child allergic if he eats them or even if he touches them? That would probably help my decision.
 

Nora

Farm Hand
Messages
46
I don't see why it has to be all or nothing. I would speak with them to find out how serious it is first. If it's life or death, then you might try to reach a reasonable and safe compromise.
 

Birdie

Farm Hand
Messages
86
I'm surprised so many people would consider acquiescing to their request. It's an unreasonable thing to ask of a neighbor in my opinion. There will always be another strawberry to avoid - at a friend's house, at a relative's house, at the store, anywhere in public. Even if the child has special needs, I'd keep my strawberry patches in the OP's case. It's clear the OP has invested the time and money into establishing a large collection of strawberry plants. I can't imagine throwing that away.
 

Farmallh

Farm Hand
Messages
95
I certainly would not get rid of my strawberry patches. I can't even believe that they asked you to. The parents should make sure their child doesn't get into them, it's that simple.
 

GrowPro

Farm Hand
Messages
43
So, whatever happened with this? I'd like to get an update if at all possible. I think it's an unusual request to make of a neighbor, so the allergy would have to be pretty severe before I'd comply.
 

Demeter

Farm Hand
Messages
16
Sorry it's taken me so long to reply, but I've been doing a ton of work in the yard thanks to my evil berries. So, the kid does have an EpiPen, but in the end, I sort of agreed to a compromise mostly because my wife didn't want to start off poorly with the new neighbors and she was genuinely concerned for the kid. I got rid of the strawberries in the front of my house since it's closest to the neighbors and that part of my yard isn't fenced in. I'm keeping the berries in the backyard because I have a chain link fence around the yard, and I've added an electrical fence to it that will shock said child should he decide to go for an evil berry. I figure it's win-win. Thanks for all of the replies. You guys truly helped me reach a decision that I was comfortable with and that the wife could support.
 
 
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